Fear of the people as a minor motive in Shakspere.
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Fear of the people as a minor motive in Shakspere. by McCloskey, John Cardinal

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Published by Shakespeare Association of America in New York, N.Y .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

From: Shakespeare Association Bulletin, vol. 17, 1942, pp. 67-72.

The Physical Object
Paginationp.p. 67-72
Number of Pages72
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19710485M

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Gonzalo - An old, honest lord, Gonzalo helped Prospero and Miranda to escape after Antonio usurped Prospero’s o’s speeches provide an important commentary on the events of the play, as he remarks on the beauty of the island when the stranded party first lands, then on the desperation of Alonso after the magic banquet, and on the miracle of the reconciliation in Act V, scene i. Horatio's role in the play is minor and most critics agree that he is not developed beyond a character foil for the great Prince. However, Horatio serves two purposes central to the drama, and it is through these purposes that we can best discuss those qualities that make Horatio memorable. Horatio is . Shakspere, we shall find, was implicated in it in a very large degree. Instead of indicating, however, that controversy by the designation under which it is known in literature, it would be more correct to put SHAKSPERE'S name in the place of that of Dekker. Many a reader who perhaps does not fully trust yet our bold assertion that Hamlet. King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. It tells the tale of a king who bequeaths his power and land to two of his three daughters, after they declare their love for him in an extremely fawning and obsequious manner.

motive, for instance, that is an overpowering one in a given period, subsequently appears grotesque, weak, or even powerless; the consequent action becomes incomprehensible, and the actor is contemned; and a simile that appeared most appropriate in the ears of the author's contemporaries, seems meaningless, or ridiculous, to later generations. 3. Yet, in spite of all these distortions of the great originals, in conformity with the taste of corrupt courts, the love and admiration of the English people for the dramas as Shakspere wrote them was attested by more than twenty complete and critical editions of his works before the end of the eighteenth century; and the high estimate of his. No motive to forge Shakspere's name, as he (Sh.) had then fallen into neglect. There was no motive for falsely stating Shakspeare's authorship, because no end would have been gained by it; for it is a fact admitting of the fullest proof, that, even so recently after Shakspeare's death . PEOPLE; Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. search Search the Wayback Machine. Featured texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top Full text of "Shakspere".

The Oedipus-Complex as An Explanation of Hamlet’s Mystery: A Study in Motive, , Ernest Jones English-speaking psychologists have as yet paid relatively little attention to the study of genius and of artistic creativeness, at least so far as the method of analysing in detail the life-history of individual men of genius is concerned. PEOPLE; Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. search Search the Wayback Machine. Featured texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection Full text of "Studies of Shakspere".   Othello, in full Othello, the Moor of Venice, tragedy in five acts by William Shakespeare, written in –04 and published in in a quarto edition from a transcript of an authorial text published in the First Folio of seems to have been based on a version revised by Shakespeare himself that sticks close to the original almost line by line but introduces numerous. Evil Under the Sun is a work of detective fiction by British writer Agatha Christie, first published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club in June and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in October of the same year. The UK edition retailed at seven shillings and sixpence (7/6) and the US edition at $ The novel features Christie's detective, Hercule Poirot, who takes a holiday in : Agatha Christie.